Car parks in congested Hong Kong

May 15th, 2015 atam Posted in Building, Climate change, Peak oil | No Comments »

The Hong Kong government is building new offices for civil servants in West Kowloon and, laudably, has included just 92 parking spaces for a complex designed to accommodate more than 10,000 civil servants.

How do you force people to take public transport rather than clog up the roads with private cars? By not providing parking spaces of course. Motorists will complain, but in a city short of housing but plagued by roadside pollution and congestion, it makes more sense to build a few extra flats than parking spaces. What the government plans to do with West Kowloon Government Offices is what the MTR has been doing with their residential properties for a while: restrict the number of parking spaces to encourage people to take public transport instead.

It’s such a sensible approach one wonders why it’s not adopted for the West Kowloon Cultural District, where billions are to be spent on a huge underground car park. Is it because it’s designed to cater to the tastes of wealthy, car-owning culture vultures? Well, respected cultural venues like the Tate Modern in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York don’t provide parking spaces, and they’re not exactly short of patrons.

But judging by one legislator’s reaction to the shortage of parking spaces at the proposed government offices, it’s clear that the concept of sustainability has yet to reach those who should know better, never mind the wider public. No wonder we’re only seeing a ‘consultation’ on electronic road pricing now, when it’s already been successfully implemented elsewhere for years.


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